What is religious fundamentalism sociology

what is religious fundamentalism sociology

What is Religious Fundamentalism?

Nov 22,  · Five Key Features of Fundamentalist Movements. According to Chapman et al () Fundamentalist movements share the following characteristics: A literal interpretation of religious texts, which are seen as infallible – they take their ‘moral codes’ straight from their sacred texts. A good fundamentalist is supposed to lead their life in accordance with the original sacred text of the . Religious Fundamentalism. Fundamentalism is an effort by religious interpreters who like to go back to that they believe to be pure and original values and behaviour. The forces of social change are important for the emergence of fundamentalism. Whenever there are drastic changes in society and a pace of change which disturbs community life, there is loss of identity and rootlessness among people.

In a global context, the issue of religious fundamentalism has emerged as a major area of media and political concern in recent decades, notably in relation to international Islamist terrorism.

The attraction what does the us constitution mean to america fundamentalism and its rigid, dogmatic beliefs is the certainty that it promises in an uncertain world. It is a retreat into faith-based answers and away from the globalising world that demands rational reasons.

Giddens identifies fundamentalist versions of several major religions, including Islam, Christianity and Hinduism. In a similar argument to that of Giddens, Zygmunt Bauman sees fundamentalism as a response to living in postmodernity. Postmodern society brings freedom of choice, uncertainty and a heightened awareness of risk, undermining the old certainties about how to live that were grounded in tradition. In this situation, while some embrace the new freedom, others are attracted to fundamentalism by its claims of absolute truth and certainty.

Similarly, Manuel Castells distinguishes between two responses to postmodernity:. Beckford criticises Giddens, Bauman and Castells on several grounds:. In the West, fundamentalism is most often a reaction to change taking place within a society, especially the trends towards diversity and choice typical of late modern or postmodern societies. Like Like. You are commenting using your WordPress. You are commenting using your Google account. You are commenting using your Twitter account.

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Notify me of new comments via email. Notify me of new posts via email. This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed. Blog at WordPress. The features of fundamentalism According to Anthony Giddens, fundamentalists are: Traditionalists who seek to return to the basics or fundamentals of their faith. Fundamentalists believe theirs is the only true view of the world.

They are intolerant and refuse to engage in dialogue with others, and they justify their views by reference to dogma and sacred texts rather than rational argument. Fundamentalists tend to avoid contact with others who think differently. They rely upon guardians of tradition, such as the clergy or elders, to interpret the sacred text and lay down rules that determine their lifestyle. Responses to postmodernity In a similar argument to that of Giddens, Zygmunt Bauman sees fundamentalism as a response to living in postmodernity.

Similarly, Manuel Castells distinguishes between two responses to postmodernity: Resistant identity — a defensive reaction of those who feel threatened and retreat into fundamentalist communities. Project identity — the response of those who are forward-looking and engage with social movements such as feminism and environmentalism.

Giddens lumps all types of fundamentalism together, ignoring important differences between them. Jeff Haynes argues that we should not focus narrowly on the idea that Islamic fundamentalism is a reaction against globalisation. For example, in the Middle East, conflicts caused by the failure of local elites to deliver on their promises to improve the standard of living are often the fuel that drives fundamentalism.

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Fundamentalism refers to “black?and?white” thinking that opposes modernism, or progressive thinking about religion and other social topics. Fundamentalist groups tend to oppose anything that challenges their religious group's interpretations and opinions. For instance, Christian fundamentalists believe in the literal inerrancy of the Bible, and often define themselves as theologically and ritually . Fundamentalism Roughly speaking, fundamentalism is a label that refers to the modern tendency – a habit of the heart and mind (Marty & Appleby , a, b, , ) – to claim the unerring nature of a sacred text and to deduce from that a rational strategy for instrumental social action. Fundamentalist religion is where religious texts are taken entirely literally, and provide a strict set of rules which people should live by. Because such a view clashes with the norm in contemporary society (pluralistic, liberal, etc.) fundamentalist religion is also often highly political.

Monthly E-magazine Current affairs Digest. Fundamentalism is an effort by religious interpreters who like to go back to that they believe to be pure and original values and behaviour. The forces of social change are important for the emergence of fundamentalism. Whenever there are drastic changes in society and a pace of change which disturbs community life, there is loss of identity and rootlessness among people. Fundamentalism offers restitution and bringing back the earlier better period.

To achieve this fundamentalists evolve a comprehensive and absolutist rigid belief system and practice. This belief is capable of intense commitment among its followers. The fundamentalism takes on a rather aggressive, militant form where killing and terrorism is justified.

Post independent India has seen an increase in the religious intolerance with religious harmony being undermined and deliberate attempts are made to encourage and intensify religious discord among different religious communities. One of the reasons being the electoral practice which encourages the formation of votebanks. The vote bank is nurtured on the basis of caste and religious lines. Another reason is the increasing size of claimants to the national economic gains.

One way of increasing the share is to mobilize politically on religious and caste lines. Thus one's religious or caste identity is emphasized more than one's national identity. Site Map. Search Enter your search terms Submit search form Web Sociologyguide. H Mead C. H Cooley B. Follow Us. Search Enter your search terms. Submit search form. Web Sociologyguide.

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